‘My God, why have you abandoned me?’

November 9th, 2015 | Posted by jameswatkins in Uncategorized


One-third of all the psalms in the Bible are what commentators call “laments.” And the lament of all laments is found in Psalm 22:

      My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?
      Why are you so far away when I groan for help?
      Every day I call to you, my God, but you do not answer.
      Every night I lift my voice, but I find no relief (22:1-2).

Have you ever felt that way? I suspect we all have! St. John of the Cross calls it “The Dark Night of the Soul.” Perhaps you’re facing Thanksgiving Day and there doesn’t seem to be anything for which to give thanks.

But I love the way the psalms of lament always end with hope:

      Yet you are holy,
      enthroned on the praises of Israel.
      Our ancestors trusted in you,
      and you rescued them.
      They cried out to you and were saved.
      They trusted in you and were never disgraced (22:3-5).

We need to keep our eyes on the big picture! God does not answer prayer on our time table. (See my post God Is Never Late, But He Sure Is Slow.) I prayed fervently for five years about a broken relationship before God answered. And I’ve been praying for ten years for a very important issue without an answer.

Apparently God doesn’t own a wrist watch. He lives in the eternal “now.” “You must not forget this one thing, dear friends: A day is like a thousand years to the Lord, and a thousand years is like a day” (2 Peter 3:8). Unfortunately, we do live in time, and a day can seem like a thousand years!

The psalmist is encouraged by two things: simply praising God despite the circumstances and remembering the many ways God has answered prayers in the past:

      I will proclaim your name to my brothers and sisters.
      I will praise you among your assembled people.
      Praise the Lord, all you who fear him!
      Honor him, all you descendants of Jacob!
      Show him reverence, all you descendants of Israel!
      For he has not ignored or belittled the suffering of the needy.
      He has not turned his back on them,
      but has listened to their cries for help.
      I will praise you in the great assembly.
      I will fulfill my vows in the presence of those who worship you (22:22-25).

The psalmist will praise God and remain faithful to his lord, even though his heart cries out, “My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?” And he hopes for a better future:

      Our children will also serve him.
      Future generations will hear about the wonders of the Lord.
      His righteous acts will be told to those not yet born.
      They will hear about everything he has done (22:30-31).

If you’re going through a time of feeling abandoned by God, I’d love to send you a free ebook of Squeezing Good Out of Bad. Just email me at jim @ jameswatkins.com.

Copyright © 2015 James N. Watkins

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2 Responses

  • Phylenia French says:

    I have to say that I have similar viewpoint as the person who responded on Facebook with “When all our worship songs are only cheerful and happy, we are not reflecting God’s world accurately.” As I attended a song service like that, I was greatly stirred to realize that, “wait a minute!” There are those who live under heavy burdens on a daily basis who can’t connect to what is being sung. There does need to be a time when we, the church, notice those among us. Really notice. With a God given discernment. Look across the congregation and ask, “where are you/they ?” And let the Spirit reveal who is in need of compassion, love. Thanks for letting me share. This post spoke to me.

    • Thanks, Phylenia! Also on Facebook:

      Linda M Au wrote, “This is why I adore the fact that our denomination sings nothing BUT psalms in public worship: They cover the gamut of human experience and you KNOW the theology is good.”

      Steve White wrote, “My favorite part, verse 0: “For the director of music. To the tune of “The Doe of the Morning.” A psalm of David. ”
      Not only is lament appropriate for our personal prayers, but for our public worship as well. When all our worship songs are only cheerful and happy, we are not reflecting God’s world accurately.”



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