When dreams die . . .

August 13th, 2014 | Posted by jameswatkins in Uncategorized


God promises Joseph that he will become a great leader—and he ends up enslaved and imprisoned in Egypt.

The prophet Elisha promises an infertile woman that she will bear a son—and the boy dies in her arms.

Jesus promises to bring a heavenly kingdom to earth—and then he and the promise are crucified and buried.

Is this disturbing pattern playing out in your life? You sense that God gives you a dream job—and months later you’re laid off. (It happened to me—twice!) God miraculously fulfills your dream of a child—and now she’s clinging to life in neo-natal intensive care. It seems God has brought the man of your dreams into your life—and now he’s killed in a traffic accident.

When our dreams die, a part of us dies as well!

I mentioned in Keeping your dreams alive another biblical pattern: The dream is received, the dreamer is refined, the dream is resized and the dream is realized. But what happens when the dream dies?

In each of the biblical instances above, the dream is received, the dream dies, and the dream is miraculously resurrected!

For the Shunammite woman, it took three attempts for her son to be brought back to life (once by Elisha’s servant, twice by the prophet). In Jesus’ case, three days in a stone cold grave. But for Joseph—and this is not exactly encouraging—13 years of slavery and imprisonment.

Perhaps the miraculous resurrection of the dream is God’s way of assuring us, it was indeed his dream for us. (There’s no way we could have brought our dead dream back to life.) And, more importantly, the dream is now infused with God’s power—not our own—to be “immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine” (Ephesians 3:20).

If you’re facing the death of your dream, I’m right there with you waiting for my miraculous resurrection as well. I’m believing with you for a resurrection!

Copyright © James N. Watkins

How has God resurrected one of your dreams? Comment below.

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