TheBestAndTheRest7

Welcome to the best—and the rest—of my week’s cartoons and comments on:

      Mind-blowing news
      Why we need editors
      Walking through life with you
      Your “write” role
      Standardized tests
      “The church is a whore . . .”
      Resources from Blue Ridge Mountains writers’ conference
      Pakistani Christian builds ‘bulletproof’ cross in Muslim country

You can follow my encouragement and entertainment daily on Facebook and Twitter.
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Thursday

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I’ll share details as they become public.


Wednesday

jimshortseditors


Walking through life with you
I am loving my time at the Blue Ridge Mountain Christian Writers’ Conference. Michelle Cox is one of the many reasons. She is an energetic bundle of encouragement! So, it’s a pleasure to welcome her to “Hope and Humor.” [Continuing reading]


Tuesday

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Your ‘write’ role
Here’s my keynote at the Blue Ridge Christian Writers’ Conference encouraging the conferees from 1 Corinthians 12 in New Living Amplified Paraphrased King James Watkins Version [Continued reading] (I’m hoping to have audio online soon.)


Standardized tests


Monday

‘The church is a whore . . .’
Augustine is credited with lamenting that “The church is a whore, but she is still my mother.” And so, as we approach, Pentecost Sunday, it’s a good time to remember, the church may not be perfect, but it is worthy of our support. [Continuing reading]


Sunday

Resources from Blue Ridge Mountains writers’ conference
I’ll be speaking on the following subjects—just in case you a) can’t be at the conference or b) my classes conflict with more interesting classes. [Continuing reading]


Saturday

crosspakistan

Pakistani Christian builds ‘bulletproof’ cross in Muslim country

      (The Washington Post) Pakistani businessman Parvez Henry Gill says he was sleeping when God crashed into one of his dreams and gave him a job: find a way to protect Christians in Pakistan from violence and abuse. “I want you to do something different,” God told him.

      That was four years ago, and Gill, a lifelong devout Christian, struggled for months with how to respond. Eventually, after more restless nights and more prayers, he awoke one morning with his answer: He would build one of the world’s largest crosses in one of the world’s most unlikely places.

      “I am going to build a big cross, higher than any in the world, in a Muslim country,” said Gill, 58. “It will be a symbol of God, and everybody who sees this will be worry-free.”

      As for the cross, Gill called it “bulletproof,” noting that it sits on a 20-foot underground base. “Tons and tons of steel, iron and cement,” he said as he looked up toward the top of the structure. “If anyone tries to hit this cross, they will not succeed.”

I don’t doubt Mr. Gill’s sincerity, but the power of the cross is not in the cross itself but in Christ himself. He promised, “I have told you all this so that you may have peace in me. Here on earth you will have many trials and sorrows. But take heart, because I have overcome the world” (John 16:33).

Our peace is in Christ, not in a “bulletproof” steel and concrete monument.

Copyright © 2015 James N. Watkins

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I am loving my time at the Blue Ridge Mountain Christian Writers’ Conference. Michelle Cox is one of the many reasons. She is an energetic bundle of encouragement! So, it’s a pleasure to welcome her to “Hope and Humor.”

Have you ever witnessed a moment of pure love that you knew would stay in your heart forever? I encountered one a few years ago, and it still moves me to tears whenever I think about it.
I was on faculty for a Christian writer’s conference. The day of sessions had come to an end, and I was enjoying some free time sitting in the lobby of the hotel chatting and laughing with some author friends.

My chair faced the entrance to the lobby and I noticed a car pull up to the covered entry in front of the door. An elderly man got out and removed the luggage from the trunk and then he and his wife came into the hotel and walked down the hallway to their room.

A little later he returned by himself to the lobby. I noticed that his steps were slow and his shoulders were slumped as if he carried the weight of the world.

He went outside to park the car and then he walked back inside. He turned towards the hallway, hesitated, and then he swiveled back towards us, walking with halting steps. “Excuse me, ladies, but are you the kind who pray?”

We all responded, “Yes sir, we are.”

“I’m a pastor and I’ve come into town to preach at a church just down the road. You might have seen my wife as we came in. She has Alzheimer’s and this is probably the last time we’ll ever get to go away together. Would you mind to pray that we could have a good weekend?”
The sadness in his eyes broke my heart. All of us replied that we’d be happy to pray for them. One of my friends asked for their names.

I swallowed around the boulder in my throat and said, “Sir, we’ll be glad to pray with you right now.”

“I would like that, but I see my wife has left the room and I need to go to her.”

I looked down the hallway, and there she came, her steps shuffling and slow, her expression distant. We watched with tears on our cheeks as he walked down the hall to meet her.

When he came beside her, she turned and they walked down the hall side by side. I watched as he reached his hand out to her. She tucked hers into his, and they walked down the hall holding hands.

She might not have remembered who he was, but she felt the comfort of his touch and knew that he loved her. I don’t know that I’ve ever witnessed a moment that was any sweeter.

We were all so overcome with emotion that it took a few minutes before any of us could speak. Then we gathered together and prayed for this dear man and his sweetheart.

I went back to my room but I couldn’t get the scene out of my head. The next morning at the breakfast table, I told some other friends about what had happened and that I wanted to go during lunch to a nearby grocery store so I could buy flowers to send to them. People started handing me money saying that they wanted to be part of it.

Word spread and by lunchtime I had a pocket full of money and gifts of books written by my author friends. I added one of my books to the pile. I went to the store and purchased a huge floral arrangement, an assortment of fruit, snack foods, a box of candy, and a card. I signed the card with the simple message, “We are praying that you’ll have a weekend to remember.” I can’t tell you how much I enjoyed that shopping trip.

When I got back to the hotel, I stopped at the front desk and asked the clerk to have the items delivered to their room. We hadn’t signed our names on the card so I didn’t expect to hear any more from them, but that night when I returned to my room there was a message on my phone. He had seen my photo on the cover of my book, recognized that I was one of the women he’d spoken with the night before, and he called to express his thanks to all of us, sharing that they were having a great weekend together and that he’d been overwhelmed by our gifts.

What he didn’t realize was that he’d given all of us an even greater gift—a reminder to enjoy the moments with our spouses, to make some memories while we can.

When I returned home, I shared the story with my husband. And then I slipped my hand into the familiar comfort of his and said, “Baby, that’s what I want for the two of us. I want to walk the halls of life still holding hands with you.”

What about you? Today would be a great day to say “I love you” and to hold hands with your sweetheart . . . just because you can.

Copyright © Michelle Cox

Thanks, Michelle!

Related posts
Hope for those affected by Alzheimers disease
Hope and humor for writers

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That got your attention, didn’t it? Augustine is credited with lamenting that “The church is a whore, but she is still my mother.” And so, as we approach, Pentecost Sunday, it’s a good time to remember, the church may not be perfect, but it is worthy of our support.

The Church is . . . the place Jesus called home

When Jesus was taken to the Temple in Jerusalem at 12 years of age, his parents left without him, assuming he was traveling in their caravan.

      Three days later they finally discovered him in the Temple, sitting among the religious teachers, listening to them and asking questions. All who heard him were amazed at his understanding and his answers.

      His parents didn’t know what to think. “Son,” his mother said to him, “why have you done this to us? Your father and I have been frantic, searching for you everywhere.”

      “But why did you need to search?” he asked. “Didn’t you know that I must be in my Father’s house?” (Luke 2:46-49).

While on earth, Jesus regularly attended “church,” which at that time were the synagogues and the Temple in Jerusalem:

      When he came to the village of Nazareth, his boyhood home, he went as usual to the synagogue on the Sabbath and stood up to read the Scriptures (Luke 4:16, emphasis mine).

The Church is . . . the Bride of Christ

      As the Scriptures say, “A man leaves his father and mother and is joined to his wife, and the two are united into one.” This is a great mystery, but it is an illustration of the way Christ and the church are one (Ephesians 5:31-32).

      For the time has come for the wedding feast of the Lamb,
      and his bride has prepared herself.
      She has been given the finest of pure white linen to wear.”
      For the fine linen represents the good deeds of God’s holy people (Revelation 19:7b-8).

Okay, the Church may not be pure as the driven snow, but the Bible describes the God/human relationship in terms of marriage and in the final book of the Bible describes the Church as the Bride of Christ.

The Church is . . . the Family of God

      And let us not neglect our meeting together, as some people do, but encourage one another, especially now that the day of his return is drawing near (Hebrews 10:25).

Anyone who claims he or she can be a Christian without Christ’s church is simply disobeying Scripture’s command to meet with other believers. Jesus himself made it very clear:

      “For where two or three gather together as my followers, I am there among them.”(Matthew 18:20).

The church is . . . the Body of Christ

The apostle Paul describes the Church as Christ’s Body:

      The human body has many parts, but the many parts make up one whole body. So it is with the body of Christ. Some of us are Jews, some are Gentiles, some are slaves, and some are free. But we have all been baptized into one body by one Spirit, and we all share the same Spirit (1 Corinthians 12:12-13).

      All of you together are Christ’s body, and each of you is a part of it (1 Corinthians 12:27).

No church is perfect. But she is Christ’s home, the Bride of Christ, the family of God and the Body of Christ. And it is the place that he has commanded us to belong to and support this coming Pentecost Sunday . . . and every Sunday.

Copyright © 2015 James N. Watkins

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I’m looking forward to being faculty at the Blue Ridge Mountains Christian Writers’ Conference: the biggest name in writing conferences. (It has 43 letters!)

I will be representing Wesleyan Publishing House, a royalty publisher, and ACW Press, an independent publisher—so I can get you published one way or another!

I’ll be speaking on the following subjects—just in case you a) can’t be at the conference or b) my classes conflict with more interesting classes.

The Ministry of Writing
Includes twenty-five-rejection-proof markets that truly do minister to needs.

Taking the Word to the Worldwide Web
Includes practical tips on “branding,” writing online as well as setting up one’s own website/blog.

Writing with Banana Peels
Based on my college text book, the seminar provides practical strategies for communicating more effectively with humor. If nothing else, you’ll laugh a lot.

Then I’ll be sharing a keynote Your Write Role based on 1 Corinthians 12 from the The New Living Amplified Paraphrased King James Watkins Version. (I hope to have the audio available soon after the conference.)

I’m looking forward to meeting you, and be sure to stop by my table at the autograph party so I don’t feel like a complete loser sitting there by myself. (I’ll have Writing with Banana Peels and Communicate to Change Lives for sale—of course!)

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TheBestAndTheRest7

Welcome to the best—and the rest—of my week’s cartoons and comments on:

      Capital punishment: serious questions
      Hope for those affected by Alzheimer’s disease
      Planes and petri dishes
      Choosing the “left-handed” path
      Picaso—and I—auction off art
      Top ten things you won’t hear at commencement
      Reboot, delete, restore—life
      America solid “green” as far as threats

You can follow my encouragement and entertainment daily on Facebook and Twitter.
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Friday

Capital punishment: serious questions
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was sentenced to death today for his part in the deadly Boston Marathon bombing reigniting the capital punishment debate. Here are some things to consider . . .


Thursday

Young hand holding old hand

The best of me is not gone
A dreadful poem, attributed to the Alzheimer’s Association, is being spread across social networks in which the author laments, “The best of me is gone.” This couldn’t be farther from the truth! [Continue reading]


Wednesday

jimshortsplanespetridishes

I’m getting packed and ready to speak at the Blue Ridge Mountains Christian Writers Conference, so I may not be posting much after today. Thanks for your prayers for safe and on-time flights to and from Asheville, North Carolina. (As you can see, flying is not my favorite thing to do.)


Choosing the ‘left-handed’ path
It’s a joy to welcome my friend—and best-selling author—Cec Murphey to “Hope and Humor.” Here’s a different slant on the road less traveled. [Continue reading]


Tuesday

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My friend, Michael Fraley added his “review” of my first attempt at analytic cubism:

      The artist who signs himself as “Evil Jim” has emerged in recent minutes as the voice of his generation. Every pixel in his opus “Les Homme d’Hope” screams outrage at the viewer and the contemporary scene, which has marginalized Evil Jim and his artist’s colony for decades. By moving the right eye upward, Evil Jim has embraced a truly binocular form of vision, becoming a man of multiple perspectives. He sees you. He sees above you. He sees below you. He sees around you. Rock of my soul in the bosom of Abraham. His eyebrows, morphed as they are into either bananas or Cheetos, reminds us to consider the hungry and the downtrodden in our lives. His blue hair reminds us to consider the needs of our cat-food-eating elderly. Lastly, his muscle shirt stands as a statement of strength in the face of intense sunburn. “Les Homme d’Hope,” we salute you, because we are you.

Thanks! Michael is actually a fine artist at Michael Fraley Studio Art.


Monday

Top ten things you won’t hear at commencement
Ever since Pebbles and Bam Bam graduated from Bedrock High, commencement speakers have been telling the field of funny hats to work for world peace, follow its dreams, and always wear clean underwear in case of an accident. So cue “Pomp and Happenstance,” here are the top ten things I’ve learned since I wore a black bathrobe. [Continue reading]


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America is solid ‘green’ as far as threats
The ISIS “cyber calipahte” has promised an online attack at 2 p.m. EST today (Monday) that “will frighten America.” Despite media coverage and Homeland Security hysteria, America is solidly “green” as far as threats. [Continue reading]

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leftturnsign

It’s a joy to welcome my friend—and best-selling author—Cec Murphey to “Hope and Humor.”

He’s a highly successful pastor, but one day we talked about failure. I first met him when he was the pastor of a 300-member congregation. A couple of years later the membership had ballooned to 900, and now they have several thousand members and established two satellite churches.

After I commented on how well he had done, my pastor friend said, “I know this is where I belong, but I’m not sure what we’re supposed to do next.” He spoke of the many opportunities to help people and he wasn’t sure which way to direct his leadership.

In our discussion, he made a comment that has stayed with me since that day nearly three years ago: “I’m not afraid of trying and failing,” he said and paused thoughtfully. “I’m afraid of succeeding at the wrong things.” He went on to say God had given him a number of gifts and he recognized them as just that—gifts.

I understood. Some of us focus on the wrong things. We try something and it’s easy and we succeed. But that may not make us contented or happy.

I thought of that conversation this morning after I came across notes I had taken more than 20 years ago when Bill Moyers interviewed Joseph Campbell on public TV. Campbell said there are two paths in life. He called the first the right-handed path because “It’s prudent and practical.” He pointed out that it was an obvious way to go. If we follow the right-handed path, it often leads to the ladder of success. “If we climb the ladder of success, eventually we learn that the ladder is against the wrong wall.”

Then he referred to the riskier left-handed path. He called it the path of following our bliss—our rapture—our ecstasy (his words).

If we take that riskier path, others might not understand, and we have no guarantee where we’ll end up. We have no assurance that we’ll achieve our goals or attain our dreams. “But if we choose the left-handed path,” Campbell said, “it’s worth it because the journey itself is its own reward.”

If we don’t take the left-handed path, we might succeed—but at the wrong things with no inner joy.

For more hope, visit Cec Murphey’s web site.

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Ever since Pebbles and Bam Bam graduated from Bedrock High, commencement speakers have been telling the field of funny hats to work for world peace, follow its dreams, and always wear clean underwear in case of an accident.

So cue “Pomp and Happenstance,” here are the top ten things I’ve learned since I wore a black bathrobe.

1. World peace isn’t going to happen. Sorry commencement speakers, presidential candidates, and Miss America contestants. Two thousand years ago Jesus said there would be wars and rumors of wars, and he hasn’t been wrong yet. Better to work at being at peace with yourself. Now if just six billion people would all do that . . .

2. Some of your dreams would turn into real nightmares if they were fulfilled, so try to be content with what you become. After years of wanting to become a famous author, I’ve learned that there are some real benefits to being un-famous. I can go anywhere I want without people hounding me for autographs, I don’t have to worry about being stalked by “Sixty Minutes” or a psycho fan (remember Misery?), and I’ve never once appeared on the cover of The National Enquirer.

3. However, good things do come to those who wait such as sex, job promotions, and senior discounts. Keep in mind, though, it takes ten years to become an overnight success.

4. It’s nice to be important, but it’s more important to be nice. I’ve had the privilege of meeting some fairly famous authors, musicians, and corporate big wigs. The one’s who’ve made it to 36 percent tax bracket are some of the nicest, down-to-earth people you’ll ever meet. It’s the “wannabes” who are often the arrogant, egocentric little twits.

5. If you love your job, you’ll never have to work a day of your life. Can you believe I actually receive good money and a free newspaper subscription to write this stuff? Please don’t tell any of my editors or publishers, but I’d gladly write for free! And what other job can you do in your underwear at 3 a.m.? (Okay, but those jobs are illegal in 49 states!)

6. It’s not what you know, but who you know. Networking is the key to meeting Mr. or Miss Right, job promotions, and great deals on used cars. Next week I’ll be on a nation-wide talk show pitching my latest books, , but that’s only because I taught a class with a guy who plays racquetball with a guy who’s a producer with The 700 Club. I wouldn’t have gotten past the switchboard if I had tried to get on the show myself. (But be careful to remember the next point!)

7. Love people, use things. And, what ever you do, don’t get that turned around.

8. The simple, obvious answer is usually wrong. And, just because it’s in print, doesn’t mean it’s true (unless of course, it’s this column.) Enjoy the naive bliss of having all the answers right now, because the more laps you take around the sun, the more complicated the cosmos becomes.

9. Life is not fair. You won’t get what you deserve. Actually, I’m glad for that. I have a wonderful wife, two great kids, and a job I love. Give me grace rather than fairness any day!

10. Not everyone is going to like you. For every card, email, or letter bomb I receive from people who loathe my column, I get four or five from readers who love it. I’ve learned to be satisfied with an 80 percent approval rating which is at least 20 points higher than Ronald Reagan received as one of America’s most popular presidents. Besides, if I had an .800 record in major league baseball, I’d be making millions endorsing athlete’s foot remedies. So, enjoy the small group of family and friends who truly love you. Besides, by the time you attend your twentieth high school reunion, you probably won’t remember half the people who wrote “love always” in your yearbook.

Of course, there are many more things I could advise (just say no to drugs, pay off your credit card balance every month, don’t pee on an electric fence, etc.) but ten seems to be the universal limit for this sort of thing. But one more bit of wisdom. If you look up and a semi truck is ready to crash through your car’s windshield, you’re not going to have clean underwear.

Congrats, grads!

Copyright © 2001 James N. Watkins

Photo from Indiana Wesleyan University. Lois and I as well as our two kiddos are alumni.

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TheBestAndTheRest7

Welcome to the best—and the rest—of my week’s cartoons and comments on:

      Happy Mother’s Day
      Honor all mothers this Sunday
      • Fine wine, violins and you

      Women prefer flab over abs
      May the 4th be with you (Happy Star Wars Day!)
      • Teacher Appreciation Week
      Brain surgeon needed in D.C.
      Thanks for your prayers

You can follow my encouragement and entertainment daily on Facebook and Twitter. And thanks for not giving up Hope & Humor for Lent!
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Friday

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Thursday

Women prefer flab over abs
Finally, some good news, guys!

      (DAILYMAIL.CO.UI) Forget six packs! Popular new Instagram account showcases unfit and flabby “dad bods” – and they’re making thousands of girls swoon.

      Clemson University sophomore Mackenzie Pearson, who BuzzFeed credits with starting the current dad bod trend, writes, “We don’t want a guy that makes us feel insecure about our body. We are insecure enough as it is. We don’t need a perfectly sculpted guy standing next to us to make us feel worse.”

      She also added that “no one wants to cuddle with a rock,” making toned bodies less desirable to snuggle up to than flabbier ones.


Wednesday

Honor all mothers this Sunday
Sarah Phillpot cautions that to some ladies, Mother’s Day is a stark reminder of what doesn’t exist. Some moms don’t have a baby to hold. They don’t have a child to dress. And on Mother’s Day, these women are sometimes accidentally ignored. Let’s change that. Let’s bring these women out of the shadows and into the light of love . . . [Continue reading]


Tuesday

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Monday

Happy Mother’s Day!
Here are some of my favorite cartoons and columns for this special weekend: [Continue reading]


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‘May the 4th be with you’
It’s Star Wars Day! (“May the 4th be with you.”) Here are some of my favorite comments and cartoons as we anticipate Episode VII: the Force Awakens: [Continue reading]


Thanks for your prayers
Here are my recent Facebook posts on my latest book proposal:

April 30 at 8:45 pm
My agent just sent my book proposal for a devotional book based on THE IMITATION OF CHRIST off to publishers. Thanks for your prayers.

May 1 at 7:04 am
Wow! You people know how to pray. Last night I posted a prayer request asking you to pray for the book proposal my agent is pitching. This morning an email that at HUGE publisher is eager to see more! (I’ll be busy this weekend.) THANKS!

May 1 at 4:37 pm
Another email from my agent that a second publisher–medium-sized–wants to take IMITATION OF CHRIST to their pub board mid May. My FB friends are “effective” and “righteous” pray-ers! Thanks!

May 4 at 3:04 pm
I was able to finish all fifteen devotions and update my proposal and get it to my agent by 10 am her time. (PDT allows me three hours of grace!) I feel very good about it, so let’s see how the two publishers who have expressed interest feel about it. Thanks for your prayers.

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SarahPhillpot

It’s an honor to welcome Sarah Phillpot to today’s Hope & Humor. She describes herself as a mom, farmer’s wife, Christian, writer, dreamer and schemer. She has a big heart for moms and dads who have lost children.

I’ve spoken with hundreds of women and have found that Mother’s Day is one of the most dreaded days of the year.

Mother’s Day brings with it a sunburst of jubilant images on social media. The feeds feature smiling kids serving breakfast and cute babies dressed in their Sunday finest. Scrolling through the posts you read women heralding, “I’m so happy to be a Mom. It’s the best gift ever.” Places of worship kindly gift flowers and trinkets to moms. Pinterest serves up all sorts of ideas for crafty projects.

But to some ladies, Mother’s Day is a stark reminder of what doesn’t exist. Some moms don’t have a baby to hold. They don’t have a child to dress. And on Mother’s Day, these women are sometimes accidentally ignored.

Let’s change that. Let’s bring these women out of the shadows and into the light of love.

Who are the mom who need extra love and support?

The invisible moms who have experienced pregnancy loss

Their babies died in the womb, but reside in heaven. The terminology used to describe that trauma, “miscarriage” and ‘stillbirth,” are deceptively simple terms that imply a slight medical procedure. But it’s not a medical procedure; it’s the loss of a precious life.

For some parents, this tragedy happens multiple times. And some of these women have no living children.

The dear moms who have outlived one or more of their children

They put in the sleepless nights, tackled the pile of never-ending laundry, and miss—more than anything—the sweet, sweet embrace of their precious child.

The hopeful women who yearn for nothing more than to be a mom

But they battle infertility. Some have lost that fight. Now people constantly question, “Why didn’t you ever have kids?” Let’s pour some love on them.

On Mother’s Day these women might put on a brave, happy face or they might avoid any and all social settings. But Mother’s Day doesn’t disappear.

Motherhood is something to be celebrated. Life should be cherished. So, this Mother’s Day let’s choose to love on all moms: the moms who have a precious baby they can hold in their arms, the moms whose sweet babies are in heaven, and the women whose heart desire was to be a mom.

How can we give that extra love and support?

If you know a woman whose baby died in the womb, a woman who has lost a living child, or a woman battling infertility recognize her this Mother’s Day. Send a text message or a greeting card, make a phone call, envelope her in a hug, or send her flowers. Use the name of her child in your conversation. It brings women comfort when you recognize her little one.
If you are at a loss for words simply write, “Hey, I know this must be a hard day for you. I just want you to know I’m thinking of you on this Mother’s Day. You are the Momma of a precious baby in heaven. I love and cherish you.”

How can pleace of worship honor all moms?

Offer a discrete but extremely meaningful gesture by lighting a candle or displaying a flower arrangement in honor of all the women whose babies are in Heaven and those women who battle infertility.

Perhaps write in the bulletin or announce, “The flowers placed at the altar table are in honor of the mothers who have experienced the death of their child, in honor of all the mothers whose babies died in the womb, and in honor of the women whose hearts’ desire was to be a mom. We love you and honor you this Mother’s Day.” Or say, “The candle in the sanctuary is lit in honor of all the moms whose babies are in heaven.”

Those are just a few simple suggestions that will make a big statement of love to all women.

What other ideas do you have?

Copyright © 2015 Sarah Philpott

Note
Crystal Hayduk commented: In addition to moms whose children have died or who women who struggle with infertility, let’s also remember the moms who have chosen to give their children life, I have been a nurse for almost 30 years, and spent many of those years working in obstetrics, including a total of 20 years in public/community health with high-risk women. I always made it a point to contact the women who had made adoption plans with a note and a flower for at least their first Mother’s Day following. Without fail, it meant the world to them. Any type of remembrance will be meaningful to them, but if you know them well enough, you can personalize the thought. If the woman loves words, then a handwritten card or note. If she prefers touch, then a visit with a hug. Other ideas based on her individual needs or desires might include a gift card to a coffee shop or a clothing store, a bag of groceries, or help with yard work to name a few.

Thanks, Sarah and Crystal. Wishing all moms and hopeful moms a very happy Mother’s Day! (Click for my salute to moms.)

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Happy Mothers’ Day!

May 4th, 2015 | Posted by jameswatkins in Uncategorized - (0 Comments)

jimshortsmothersday3
Here are some of my favorite cartoons and columns for this special weekend:

Faith of Our Mothers
Some new lyrics for an old, old song

The papoose-driven life
Lessons learned from a four-month-old grandaughter

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Son of a saint!
When godly parents have not-so-godly children

“Spray paint” parenting
The secret is thin coats of moral and ethical lessons

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Talking to your kids about S-E-X
Children will learn about sex—from us or the bus!

Talking to children about war, terrorism, school violence . . .
It’s a frightening time to be a child—and a parent

mom

Top ten things my mom taught me
(Yep, that’s my mom above.)

You may be a parent if . . .
. . . you’ve ever uttered one or more of these classic lines

jimshortsparenting

jimshortschildren

Praying that have a great Mother’s Day weekend, whether a mom or child!
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